All posts tagged Digital Humanities

Mapping St Petersburg: Literature as data?

Cross-posted with Mapping St Petersburg. We’ve added a map of Dostoevsky’s addresses to Mapping St Petersburg, and this seems like a good opportunity to discuss the question of data. In comparison with our work on the Crime and Punishment maps, mapping addresses was easy: information on where Dostoevsky lived is well established and available from […]

Mapping Petersburg

Over the last few months I have been working with John Levin on the pilot for a digital Russian literature project, and last week we launched the website, Mapping Petersburg: Experiments in Literary Cartography. The project aims to explore the role of Petersburg’s topography in shaping the literature for which the city is so famous, […]

Blogs and academic publishing

This week has seen the launch of the Russian History Blog, a collaborative project that has already featured, among other things, a review of the Gulag escape film The Way Back, addressing questions surrounding the authenticity of the book it is based on, Slavomir Rawicz’s The Long Walk, and a discussion of a very significant […]

One year old today: where do I go from here?

Today is the first anniversary of my blog, and I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve done so far and what I’m planning to do in the coming months. I’ve made a couple of discoveries over the last year. I’ve realized that cats, the Crystal Palace, and Merthyr Tydfil all attract a more readers than Russian […]

Russkii vestnik 1866

It’s hard to get beyond the literary contributions to Russkii vestnik for 1866, as it features both the first of Dostoevsky’s major novels, Crime and Punishment, and parts of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. There are also poems by Fet and A. K. Tolstoy, and two works by Boborykin, The World of Success and In a […]

Russkii vestnik 1867

In 1867, Russkii vestnik published Turgenev’s novel Smoke, as well as two articles in Vladimir Dal”s series Pictures of Russian life and poetry by A. N. Maikov, A. A. Fet, and Count A. K. Tolstoy. A translation of the first part of Faust appears in the July issue. There are articles by Laroche, on the […]

Russkii vestnik 1868

The highlight of Russkii vestnik for 1868 was the publication of Dostoevsky’s novel The Idiot, but other notable features are articles by N. A. Liubimov on advances in Physics, Hermann Laroche on Glinka, A. D. Gradovsky on Russian historical literature, and Gustave de Molinari (a regular contributor on European affairs) on the 1867 World Exhibition […]

Russkii vestnik 1869

Russkii vestnik was published from 1856 to 1906. Founded by Mikhail Nikiforovich Katkov, who edited it until his death in 1887, it became one of the most influential literary-philosophical journals of the second half of the nineteenth century, publishing nearly all the great novels of that period: Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, Demons and […]

Russian journals on Google books

There are some amazing resources on Google books, which can really transform the way scholars work and particularly the time spent on locating materials. As a postgrad in the late 1990s, when I wanted to find out about the serial publication of The Idiot, I ended up having to consult the journal in a library […]

Why I blog

I’ve been blogging for a few months now (see my archive — I realized I had enough posts to make it worthwhile), and as I finally decided it was time pay some attention to what my site looks like (this is still a work in progress, so there will be further changes in the coming […]