All posts tagged cats

Top Ten Animals in Russian Literature

As I have suggested previously, animals have a significant place in Russian literature, and I think this is quite unusual, probably reflecting the greater proximity of Russia literature to its folklore roots than is the case with other literary cultures. Although obviously children’s stories in English (as in other languages), are full of animal characters, […]

Four short links: Russian oddments

1. Hermitage cats. For over 250 years – with a break during the siege when they sadly all perished – the Hermitage has been home to an army of 50 or so cats, and every year the museum holds a Cat Day in March with lots of cat-related events to celebrate the Winter Palace’s most […]

One year old today: where do I go from here?

Today is the first anniversary of my blog, and I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve done so far and what I’m planning to do in the coming months. I’ve made a couple of discoveries over the last year. I’ve realized that cats, the Crystal Palace, and Merthyr Tydfil all attract a more readers than Russian […]

I love Orlando

For some reason I feel a sudden urge to declare my undying love for Orlando the Marmalade Cat. Okay, so this isn’t the real Orlando, because I can’t find any images that are out of copyright, but I hereby declare Orlando to be the king of fictional felines. Continuing the ‘cat in plant pot’ theme. […]

Gratuitous cat picture (2)

I’ve received complaints that my random musings on Russian literature detracted from enjoyment of the last picture of my cat I posted. So here she is, indulging in one of her favourite activities: watching nature programmes.

Blogging from BASEES

The end of term has arrived and with it the BASEES annual conference, so here I am in Cambridge in the slightly unlovely environs and overheated rooms of Fitzwilliam College. To be fair, they have made a lot of improvements to the college since I first visited BASEES as a tender postgrad, and it is […]

Gratuitous cat picture

…because it’s what the internet’s for. There is a tenuous Russian connection, as although she’s universally known as Chicken, her real name is in fact Chapaev. When she first came into my life, I was reading Victor Pelevin’s novel┬áChapaev i Pustota (variously translated as The Clay Machine Gun and Buddha’s Little Finger). It’s far from […]